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U.S. State Dept. decries sentencing of Nabeel Rajab in Bahrain

U.S. State Department spokesperson Victoria Nuland addressed questions regarding the sentencing of Nabeel Rajab in Bahrain today during a press briefing.  She asserted that the State Department had urged the government not to proceed with the trial of Nabeel Rajab, and that they would prefer the sentence related to illegal gathering to be “vacated.”

“This is an inappropriate case to begin with,” stated Ms. Nuland. She also stated that she believed the Embassy had been in contact with Bahraini authorities today.

“….we’ve long made clear that it’s critical for all governments, including Bahrain, to respect freedom of expression, freedom of assembly, so we are deeply troubled by the sentencing today of Nabeel Rajab to three years in prison on charges of illegally gathering. We believe that all people have a fundamental freedom to participate in civil acts of peaceful disobedience, and we call on the Government of Bahrain to take steps to build confidence across Bahraini society and to begin a really meaningful dialogue with the political opposition and civil society, because actions like this sentencing today only serve to further divide Bahraini society.”

Another sentence is pending, regarding the activist’s Twitter messages.

 

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17 Senators and Members of Congress call for the release of Nabeel Rajab and all Bahrainis detained for crimes related to freedom of expression

August 10, 2012

His Majesty King Hamad Bin Isa AI-Khalifa
The Amiri Court, Riffa Palace
P.O. Box 555
Manama, Bahrain

Your Royal Highness,

We write to express our concern regarding Nabeel Rajab and other Bahrainis who have been prosecuted for crimes related to freedom of expression. We understand Mr. Rajab was imprisoned for calling for the resignation of the Prime Minister via Twitter, an Internet-messaging program. We respectfully request that you use your authority to order Mr. Rajab’s release under the universal principle that all citizens should have the right to peacefully express disagreement with their government.

Reports indicate many Bahrainis have been imprisoned for peaceful political activities since the start of pro-democracy demonstrations in February 2011. According to the Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry (BICI), the National Safety Courts convicted approximately 300 people for exercising their right to free expression and peaceful assembly. Since Your Excellency’s endorsement of the BICI report and its recommendations, Bahraini officials have repeatedly stated that individuals prosecuted for political speech would be released, and that no one would face prosecution for exercising these rights.

We recognize that the Bahraini government has taken positive steps to implement certain BICI recommendations. These steps represent important progress. However, recent charges against Nabeel Rajab, the president of the Bahrain Center for Human Rights, run counter to the government’s assurances that individuals will not be prosecuted for peaceful political speech. Bahraini authorities have prosecuted Mr. Rajab five separate times, and in each case the charges appear to have been based on peaceful dissent and peaceful protests. Mr. Rajab was sentenced to three months in prison after “tweeting” that the Prime Minister should resign.

Mr. Rajab is also facing three other active prosecutions related to “illegal gatherings;” however, reports indicate prosecutors have produced no evidence that the protests at issue were violent or threatened violence.

In sum, we remain very concerned about the ongoing prosecution of peaceful opposition activists such as Nabeel Rajab for taking part in activities protected by international law and the Bahraini Constitution, notwithstanding Your Excellency’s acceptance of the BICI recommendations and the government’s reassurances that it does not conduct political prosecutions.  We therefore respectfully urge the government to unconditionally and immediately release all Bahrainis being held for crimes related to freedom of expression.

Sincerely,

Keith Ellison, Member of Congress

Patrick Leahy, United States Senator

John Conyers, Member of Congress

Ron Wyden, United States Senator

Raul Grijalva, Member of Congress

Alcee Hastings, Member of Congress

Rush Holt, Member of Congress

Michael Honda, Member of Congress

Hank Johnson, Member of Congress

Barbara Lee, Member of Congress

Zoe Lofgren, Member of Congress

James P. McGovern, Member of Congress

James P. Moran, Member of Congress

John Olver, Member of Congress

Jared Polis, Member of Congress

Charles Rangel, Member of Congress

Jan Schakowsky, Member of Congress

Bahrain is putting the cart before the horse with its latest attempts at so-called social reconciliation

The government of Bahrain announced last week that they would provide the equivalent of $500,000 US to non-governmental organizations that develop ” social reconciliation” programs.  The Orwellian twist is that this latest effort joins previous initiatives aimed at Bahrainis — primarily at children and young people in school and camp settings — to attempt to influence them to “forgive and forget” past abuses and transgressions by the regime.  This, while Bahraini forces continue to tear gas and shoot birdshot pellets at its citizens, and people who have been tortured, innocent of wrongdoing, still languish in Bahraini prisons, including Abdulhadi Alkhawaja.

In addition to the the deaths and injuries related to police brutality, dozens of women in Bahrain have miscarried their unborn children because of excessive exposure to tear gas.

Perhaps this money might be better spent on reforming the regime’s security and police forces.  Oh, right, they tried that.  Efforts in that direction seem to be fruitless.  The regime’s forces are as vicious as ever.

Royalists in Bahrain label any person who supports the opposition, democracy, and human rights as a “terrorist” and anyone who attempts to bring light to these injustices as an instigator of violence.  The lion’s share of violence, however, is coming from the regime, as numerous, reputable journalists, human rights organizations, and witnesses have reported again and again.

Evidently “social reconciliation” in Bahrain does not involve protecting the human right freedom of speech.  At time of this announcement, the government banned all demonstrations and marches and imprisoned one of the nation’s foremost civil rights leaders, Nabeel Rajab, for speaking his mind on Twitter.

While Bahrain continues to imprison political prisoners…arrest, beat, and torture citizens for speaking their mind…tear-gassing villages…blinding and maiming children and adults with birdshot….any discussion of “reconciliation” is premature.

After all, we are not talking about a parking ticket here.  There have been hundreds of documented cases of human rights abuses, including torture and loss of life.  People have disappeared who are still not accounted for.  People have lost their jobs because of their beliefs.  Mosques, hundreds of years old, have been destroyed.

What kind of reconciliation was Bahrain seeking when they shot a tear gas canister into Zainab Alkhawaja’s leg at close range on June 27?  What kind of reconciliation were they seeking when they shot four-year-old Ahmed Alneham with buckshot, maiming him for life, while his father begged them to stop?

Actions speak louder than words.  Peace is impossible without freedom.  Reforms first — then reconciliation.

 

Nabeel Rajab: imprisoned for tweets, paying the price for the struggle for freedom

Witness Bahrain interviewed human rights activist and Bahrain Center for Human Rights President Nabeel Rajab in Bahrain yesterday (July 9) just before he was taken to jail for a three-month sentence related to an update he posted on Twitter.

In the video, Rajab states: “I will not stop and I’m teaching people not to stop. If everybody will keep quiet after putting them in jail, then it’s a disaster. We should challenge that. We should be willing to pay the price for the struggle for the freedom that we fight for. And this is the price.”

Read the entire Witness for Bahrain blog post here.

New updates to the Twitter and our blog from our “on the ground” blogger

As you know, the Bahrain Coordinating Committee serves to both educate and promote the causes of human rights and democracy in Bahrain.

To that end, we are pleased to announce a series of tweets and blog posts which will appear over the next few weeks.  Our undercover witness, a Bahrain Coordinating Committee member, will post updates from Bahrain on Twitter and on this blog, presenting you with a timely and authentic view of the situation “on the ground.”

For security reasons, the identity of the blogger will remain anonymous.  Visit our Twitter account @Connect_Bahrain and follow the hashtag #BCCLive to see up-to-the minute reporting from Bahrain, starting today.

Blog Posts will appear on this blog under the “Bahrain Coordinating Committee Administrator” account.

Follow us on Twitter and subscribe today so you don’t miss a single tweet or post in this interesting series.

Nabeel Rajab arrested on unspecified charges after The Stream interview

Nabeel Rajab, President of the Bahrain Human Center for Human Rights, was arrested once again, yesterday, and remanded to jail for seven days, on

English: Nabeel Rajab protesting outside Muhar...

Nabeel Rajab (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

unspecified charges related to Twitter updates he posted.  Bahrain officials said they had received complaints about negative comments he allegedly made on social media sites about the residents of Muharraq.

Rajab alleges that the arrest was prompted by his Tuesday appearance, with Matar Matar, on the Al-Jazeera program, The Stream.

Fahad Albinali, media spokesperson at the Information Affairs Authority, refuted that anyone would be prosecuted for their statements on the program:

Subsequent to receiving the summons to appear, Rajab shared his theories of what circumstances led to the investigation:

Connect with the Bahrain Coordinating Committee Online

Bahrain Coordinating Committee on TwitterSocial media can be used to inform, educate, support, and connect.  It can also be a powerful communications medium for positive change.  The Bahrain Coordinating Committee is taking full advantage of the communication potential of social media.  Connect with us online!

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Bahrain is the focus for Monday’s edition of The Stream

Bahrain will be the focus of Al Jazeera English‘s innovative “social media” television show, The Stream, this Monday, June 4, at 3:30 p.m. EST (19:30 GMT), 10:30 p.m. Bahrain time. The guests are President of Bahrain Center for Human Rights Nabeel Rajab (@NABEELRAJAB) , former Member of Parliament for Al Wifaq and political activist Matar Ebrahim Matar (@Matar_Matar) , and an IAA spokesperson.

The host and guests will discuss such questions as

  • Is reconciliation between the opposition and the government still possible?
  • What are the prospects for constructive reforms and reconciliation?
  • What steps need to be taken?

This edition of The Stream will be produced by Aws Haidari.  You can follow him on Twitter @awshaidari and tweet him and @ajstream your thoughts and comments before the show.  Alternatively, you can follow this link to upload a video or record your questions and comments. If you your comment doesn’t fit in a tweet, you can leave one on their Facebook page here http://www.facebook.com/AJStream.

During the live show on Monday, you can use Twitter hashtag #AJStream , and tweet The Stream host Imran Garda (@ImranGarda) and the digital producer Malika Bilal (@mmbilal) to share your thoughts and questions.

The Stream is a half-hour television show, is broadcast in English, and is live-streamed online.  Watch The Stream live online http://stream.aljazeera.com for free.

In the DC area, The Stream and other Al Jazeera programs appear on Cox cable channel #474 and on Comcast #275, as well as on other television channels.

The Stream, which features stories that are topical on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and even Pinterest, appears on Al-Jazeera English Monday – Thursday, and has gained popularity since its launch in April 2011.

“The idea is to tap into conversations that are already happening around the world from people who understand the issues but don’t have the opportunity to participate in mainstream media, ” said former The Stream host Ahmed Shihab-Eldin.

Thanks for sharing the news of this television program and important discussion with your friends.

Bahrain Update: Solidarity Rally for Nabeel Rajab

Bahrainis gathered yesterday to demonstrate their support for Nabeel Rajab, President of the Bahrain Center for Human Rights and the Gulf Center for Human Rights.  Mr. Rajab was recently released from prison on bail for posting Twitter updates the government said were illegal.  The participants held up copies of Mr. Rajab’s tweets.  One of the tweets deemed illegal by the government showed a picture of Ali Issa Saqr who had been tortured and killed while imprisoned.  Mr. Rajab’s next hearing has been scheduled for June 17

The Bahrain Coordinating Committee lends its full support for Nabeel Rajab and for his right to free political expression, and submits that all charges against him should be dismissed.

 

Bahrain Coordinating Committee Pledges Its Support For Freed Activist Zainab Al-Khawaja

 Bahrain Activist Zainab Al-Khawaja is Freed; Bahrain Coordinating Committee Pledges Its Support

Zainab Al-Khawaja[Washington, DC]   May 29, 2012 — The DC-based Bahrain Coordinating Committee is pleased by today’s reports that Zainab Al-Khawaja, daughter of renowned human rights activist Abdulhadi Al-Khawaja, has been released from prison in Bahrain, after her trial last week and the payment of her bail (BD 200, about $530 US).

The Committee supports Al-Khawaja’s right to free political expression and her commitment to achieving human rights for the people of Bahrain.

Khawaja was sentenced to one month in jail for protesting the Formula One Grand Prix in Bahrain.  However, since she had already served more than a month in jail — – having been arrested on April 21 — she was freed.

The 29 year-old activist will appear in court again on June 24 to face charges related to organizing demonstrations.

Khawaja is known for her tenacious participation in demonstrations and sit-ins supporting the pro-democracy movement in Bahrain.  She has emerged as a dynamic voice of the opposition, particularly in her use of social media.  Khawaja has more than 42,000 Twitter followers and posts updates on her Twitter profile @angryarabiya.

About the Bahrain Coordinating Committee

The Bahrain Coordinating Committee is a Washington, DC-based grassroots movement that works to obtain U.S. support for democracy and human rights reforms in Bahrain.  For more information, please visit http://www.BahrainCoordinatingCommittee.org