For the Record: White House Statements on Bahrain

President Barack Obama delivers a statement in...

President Barack Obama delivers a statement in the East Room of the White House  (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

April 2012

The White House: Statement by the Press Secretary on the Situation in Bahrain (April 11, 2012)

The United States continues to be deeply concerned about the situation in Bahrain, and we urge all parties to reject violence in all its forms.  We condemn the violence directed against police and government institutions, including recent incidents that have resulted in serious injuries to police officers.  We also call on the police to exercise maximum restraint, and condemn the use of excessive force and indiscriminate use of tear gas against protestors, which has resulted in civilian casualties.

We continue to underscore, both to the government and citizens of Bahrain, the importance of working together to address the underlying causes of mistrust and to promote reconciliation.  In this respect, we note our continued concern for the well-being of jailed activist Abdulhadi Al-Khawaja and call on the Government of Bahrain to consider urgently all available options to resolve his case.  More broadly, we urge the government to redouble its ongoing efforts to implement the recommendations of the Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry, and renew our call for the government, opposition parties, and all segments of Bahraini society to engage in a genuine dialogue leading to meaningful reforms that address the legitimate aspirations of all Bahrainis.

November 2011

The White House: Statement by the Press Secretary on Bahrain (November 23, 2011)

We welcome today’s report by the Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry, which provides a thorough and independent assessment of events in Bahrain since protests first erupted in February.  King Hamad’s decision to establish the Commission was a courageous one, and we commend him for it.  We commend the chairman of the Commission, Cherif Bassiouni and the other commissioners for their thorough and painstaking efforts over nearly 5 months.  The report identifies a number of disturbing human rights abuses that took place during this period, and it is now incumbent upon the Government of Bahrain to hold accountable those responsible for human rights violations and put in place institutional changes to ensure that such abuses do not happen again.

We welcome King Hamad’s commitment to carry out the report’s recommendations and will closely follow the implementation process.  More broadly, we believe the Commission’s report and subsequent steps taken to implement its recommendations can serve as a foundation for advancing reconciliation and reform.  Bahrain is a long-standing partner of the United States, and we urge the government and all parties to take steps that lead to respect for universal human rights and to meaningful reforms that meet the legitimate aspirations of all Bahrainis.

July 2011

The White House: Statement by the Press Secretary on the Situation in Bahrain (July 2, 2011)

President Obama welcomes the launch of the National Dialogue in Bahrain, which represents an important moment of promise for the people of Bahrain.  The United States commends King Hamad bin Isa al-Khalifa for his leadership in initiating the dialogue. We also commend the decision by Al Wifaq, Bahrain’s largest opposition group, to join the dialogue.  We urge all Bahrainis to seize this opportunity to forge a more just future together. It is important that government and political leaders create a positive atmosphere to help promote a successful dialogue process.  The United States also welcomes the formation of a commission of inquiry to investigate and report on events connected with the unrest of recent months.  By providing an independent assessment of what happened and identifying those responsible, the Royal Commission will play an essential role in advancing reconciliation, justice, and peace in Bahrain. As a long-standing partner of Bahrain, the United States continues to believe that Bahrain’s stability will be enhanced by respecting the universal rights of the people of Bahrain and reforms that meet the aspirations of all Bahrainis.

June 2011

Readout of the President’s Meeting With His Highness Salman bin Hamad Al Khalifa, Crown Prince of Bahrain (June 7, 2011)

The President met today and had a productive discussion with His Highness Salman bin Hamad Al Khalifa, Crown Prince of Bahrain, following the Crown Prince’s meeting with National Security Advisor Tom Donilon.  The President reaffirmed the strong commitment of the United States to Bahrain. He welcomed King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa’s decision to end the State of National Safety early and the announcement that the national dialogue on reform would begin in July.  He also expressed strong support for the Crown Prince’s ongoing efforts to initiate the national dialogue and said that both the opposition and the government must compromise to forge a just future for all Bahrainis.  To create the conditions for a successful dialogue, the President emphasized the importance of  following through on the government’s commitment to ensuring that those responsible for human rights abuses will be held accountable.  The President noted that, as a long-standing partner of Bahrain, the United States believes that the stability of Bahrain depends upon respect for the universal rights of the people of Bahrain, including the right to free speech and peaceful assembly, and a process of meaningful reform that is responsive to the aspirations of all.

May 2011

The White House: Remarks by the President on the Middle East and North Africa (May 19, 2011)

… Bahrain is a longstanding partner, and we are committed to its security.  We recognize that Iran has tried to take advantage of the turmoil there, and that the Bahraini government has a legitimate interest in the rule of law.

Nevertheless, we have insisted both publicly and privately that mass arrests and brute force are at odds with the universal rights of Bahrain’s citizens, and we will — and such steps will not make legitimate calls for reform go away.  The only way forward is for the government and opposition to engage in a dialogue, and you can’t have a real dialogue when parts of the peaceful opposition are in jail.  (Applause.)  The government must create the conditions for dialogue, and the opposition must participate to forge a just future for all Bahrainis.

February 2011

The White House: Statement by President Obama on violence in Bahrain, Libya and Yemen (February 18, 2011)

I am deeply concerned by reports of violence in Bahrain, Libya and Yemen. The United States condemns the use of violence by governments against peaceful protesters in those countries and wherever else it may occur. We express our condolences to the family and friends of those who have been killed during the demonstrations. Wherever they are, people have certain universal rights including the right to peaceful assembly. The United States urges the governments of Bahrain, Libya and Yemen to show restraint in responding to peaceful protests, and to respect the rights of their people.

The White House: Statement by President Obama on Bahrain (February 27, 2011)

I welcome the announcement by King Hamad bin Isa al-Khalifa about making important changes to the cabinet and restating his commitment to reform. The United States supports the national dialogue initiative led by Crown Prince Salman bin Hamad al-Khalifa, and encourages a process that is meaningful, inclusive, non sectarian, and responsive to the people of Bahrain. The dialogue offers an opportunity for meaningful reform and for all Bahrainis to forge a more just future together. As a long standing partner of Bahrain, the United States continues to believe that Bahrain’s stability will be enhanced by respecting the universal rights of the people of Bahrain and reforms that meet the aspirations of all Bahrainis.

May 2010

The White House: Readout of Vice President Biden’s Meeting with Bahrain’s Crown Prince Salman bin Hamad Al Khalifa (May 20, 2010)

The Vice President met today with Crown Prince Salman bin Hamad Al Khalifa of Bahrain.  The Vice President and Crown Prince reaffirmed their commitment to a wide-ranging, long-term and strategic partnership between the United States and Bahrain.  They reviewed progress on bilateral and regional issues, such as Iraq, Arab-Israeli peace, support for Afghanistan, and international efforts to ensure Iran complies with its United Nations Security Council and IAEA obligations.

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  1. 1st, shame on Taylor for denying that he doesn’t know about the dteained players. If he doesn’t know about them then he wasn’t following any matches in Asia cup in year 2004 and doesn’t fit for the coach position.2nd, FIFA should refer to the BICI report issued last November to check if the players and other citizens in Bahrain were tortured and sacked from their jobs for practicing their rights of speech.Bahrain FA is always managed by a ruling family since the 1970 and it has not received any trophy or a title in contrast to the other games like basketball, volleyball and tennis to mention few where Bahrain has won title in the gulf and the Arab world.

  2. I had to laugh at the part which read that unemployment in Bahrain is rife. But it is true.When I was there for desret storm, there were a lot of Filipinos doing work furloughs in Bahrain earning pennies an hour. They occupied all of the jobs that regular Bahrainis didn’t want – restaurant workers, hotel personnel, etc. Maybe that helps explain their unemployment status.The same goes for places such as Dubai in the UAE. Slave labor is rife in the entire Middle East. They import poor laborers to do the tasks that the lazy Muslims will not do.

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