Category Archives: Detained Bahraini Activists

Al-Wefaq demands an immediate release of all political figures in Bahrain

AlWefaq National Islamic Society LOGO

AlWefaq National Islamic Society LOGO (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bahrain’s largest political opposition group, Al-Wefaq, has demanded an immediate release for 21 imprisoned political figures and activists in Bahrain.  The organization asserts that they are prisoners of conscience and should be freed.

A statement published by the organization on Saturday stated that the “BICI report, Geneva recommendations, other international reports and the facts of cases lead collectively to the necessity of releasing all detained political figures”.

 “Their stay in detention makes them political hostages as they are detained due to political grounds. It is considered as a political persecution and reflects the travesty of justice.”

“The issue of prisoners of conscience and political hostages highlights the essential need for a political resolution which can unequivocally take Bahrain to the real democracy; where the state works on development and progress instead of arbitrary arrests, fighting the other opinion and targeting innocent people.”

Advertisements

Bahrain court upholds military court rulings against activists

Bahrain has sentenced twenty activists to prison sentences ranging from five years to life.  Among those sentenced were Abdulhadi Al Khawaja, who underwent a 110-day hunger strike earlier this year in protest of his torture and mistreatment by security and prison staff.

The Bahrain Youth Society for Human Rights reported on the verdicts on the cases of twenty activists which were upheld from previous sentences by military courts today.  Charges included attempting to overthrow the government.

The sentences may be appealed to the Supreme Court in Bahrain.  Some analysts have speculated that the government is holding the activists as a bargaining chip in upcoming talks with the opposition; others posit the rulings are a concession to hardliners with the government and an attempt to send a defiant message to the U.S. and other nations who have called for clemency.

Whatever the motives, the widely-condemned sentences will surely continue to polarize the nation and obstruct dialogue.  The government’s official news media has branded the activists as “terrorists.”

The thirteen activists who are currently imprisoned were charged by the National Safety Court, a military tribunal, in June 2011 after being arrested in February and March 2011.  These trials were later deemed unlawful and have been criticized as violations of human rights.  It is acknowledged and documented that the confessions that led to the June sentences were extracted through extreme instances of torture.  Yet, today those sentences were upheld by a civilian court.

“Today’s court decision is another blow to justice and it shows once more that the Bahraini authorities are not on the path of reform but seem rather driven by vindictiveness.” Hassiba Hadj Sahraoui, deputy director of Amnesty’s Middle East and North Africa Programme (AFP).

Sentenced to life in prison:

  • Abdulwahab Hussain Ali
  • Abduljalil Abdullah Al Singace, Haq Movement for Liberty and Democracy
  • Abdulhadi Al Khawaja, President, Bahrain Centre for Human Rights
  • Abduljalil Mansoor Makk (Abdul Jalil Miqdad)
  • Mohammed Habib Al Safaf ( Mohammed Habib Miqdad)
  • Hassan Ali Mushaima
  • Saeed Mirza Ahmed. ( Saeed AlNouri)

Sentenced to fifteen years in prison:

  • Abdul Hadi Abdullah Mahdi Hassan ( Abdulhadi AlMukhodher)
  • Mohammed Ali Ismael
  • 
Mohammed Hassan Jawad

Sentenced to five years in prison:

  • Abdullah Isa Al Mahroos
  • Ibrahim Sharif Abdulraheem Mossa
  • Salah Hubail Al Khawaj

Seven activists were sentenced in absentia. Sentenced to life in prison was Saeed Abdulnabi Shehab.  The remaining six activists who are not currently in prison were sentenced to fifteen years:

  • Akeel Ahmed Al Mafoodh
  • Ali Hassan Abdulla (Ali Abdulemam) – blogger
  • Abdulghani Ali Khanjar
  • Abdulraoof Al Shayeb
  • Abbas Al Omran
  • Ali Hassan Mushaima


Here are some of today’s news stories on the developments.

Andrew Hammond, Reuters: UPDATE 2-Bahrain court upholds sentences on uprising leaders

Al Jazeera: Bahrain courts uphold activists’ conviction

Associated Press: Bahrain court upholds life sentences for opposition activists (appeared in Washington Post and New York Times)

Frank Gardner, BBC News: Bahrain appeal court upholds activists’ convictions

Bahrain Coordinating Committee calls for release of imprisoned activist Nabeel Rajab in Bahrain

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 17, 2012 — The Washington, DC-based Bahrain Coordinating Committee strongly condemns the prison sentence of three years on charges of illegal gathering imposed on Bahraini human rights activist Nabeel Rajab. The group condemns all forms of repression, and calls on the government and its agents to respect the universal human right of peaceful freedom of expression, along with other basic human rights.

US human rights group calls for release of imprisoned activist Nabeel Rajab in BahrainOn August 16, 2012, the Lower Criminal Court in Manama, Bahrain sentenced Rajab, president of the Bahrain Centre for Human Rights, to three years in prison for participating in “illegal protests.” In Bahrain, a protest is illegal if it is not officially permitted by the government, and all opposition protests have been deemed “unauthorized” in recent months. The court also alleged that Rajab incited attacks against security forces. Rajab will appeal the decision.

The U.S. State Department also condemned the trial and sentence of Nabeel Rajab yesterday.

Thirteen other political dissidents, imprisoned on charges passed down by military courts during the government crackdowns on protests in 2011, remain behind bars while they wait for their sentences to be re-tried in civilian courts, per the BICI recommendations made to the government of Bahrain. Those trials were postponed until September 2012.

The government of the United States has called on the government of Bahrain to release them and anyone else detained for expressing his or her personal beliefs without violence in the Gulf nation.

About the Bahrain Coordinating Committee

The Bahrain Coordinating Committee is a Washington, DC-based grassroots movement that works to obtain U.S. support for democracy and human rights reforms in Bahrain.  More information can be found online at http://bahraincoordinatingcommittee.org

# # #

U.S. State Dept. decries sentencing of Nabeel Rajab in Bahrain

U.S. State Department spokesperson Victoria Nuland addressed questions regarding the sentencing of Nabeel Rajab in Bahrain today during a press briefing.  She asserted that the State Department had urged the government not to proceed with the trial of Nabeel Rajab, and that they would prefer the sentence related to illegal gathering to be “vacated.”

“This is an inappropriate case to begin with,” stated Ms. Nuland. She also stated that she believed the Embassy had been in contact with Bahraini authorities today.

“….we’ve long made clear that it’s critical for all governments, including Bahrain, to respect freedom of expression, freedom of assembly, so we are deeply troubled by the sentencing today of Nabeel Rajab to three years in prison on charges of illegally gathering. We believe that all people have a fundamental freedom to participate in civil acts of peaceful disobedience, and we call on the Government of Bahrain to take steps to build confidence across Bahraini society and to begin a really meaningful dialogue with the political opposition and civil society, because actions like this sentencing today only serve to further divide Bahraini society.”

Another sentence is pending, regarding the activist’s Twitter messages.

 

17 Senators and Members of Congress call for the release of Nabeel Rajab and all Bahrainis detained for crimes related to freedom of expression

August 10, 2012

His Majesty King Hamad Bin Isa AI-Khalifa
The Amiri Court, Riffa Palace
P.O. Box 555
Manama, Bahrain

Your Royal Highness,

We write to express our concern regarding Nabeel Rajab and other Bahrainis who have been prosecuted for crimes related to freedom of expression. We understand Mr. Rajab was imprisoned for calling for the resignation of the Prime Minister via Twitter, an Internet-messaging program. We respectfully request that you use your authority to order Mr. Rajab’s release under the universal principle that all citizens should have the right to peacefully express disagreement with their government.

Reports indicate many Bahrainis have been imprisoned for peaceful political activities since the start of pro-democracy demonstrations in February 2011. According to the Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry (BICI), the National Safety Courts convicted approximately 300 people for exercising their right to free expression and peaceful assembly. Since Your Excellency’s endorsement of the BICI report and its recommendations, Bahraini officials have repeatedly stated that individuals prosecuted for political speech would be released, and that no one would face prosecution for exercising these rights.

We recognize that the Bahraini government has taken positive steps to implement certain BICI recommendations. These steps represent important progress. However, recent charges against Nabeel Rajab, the president of the Bahrain Center for Human Rights, run counter to the government’s assurances that individuals will not be prosecuted for peaceful political speech. Bahraini authorities have prosecuted Mr. Rajab five separate times, and in each case the charges appear to have been based on peaceful dissent and peaceful protests. Mr. Rajab was sentenced to three months in prison after “tweeting” that the Prime Minister should resign.

Mr. Rajab is also facing three other active prosecutions related to “illegal gatherings;” however, reports indicate prosecutors have produced no evidence that the protests at issue were violent or threatened violence.

In sum, we remain very concerned about the ongoing prosecution of peaceful opposition activists such as Nabeel Rajab for taking part in activities protected by international law and the Bahraini Constitution, notwithstanding Your Excellency’s acceptance of the BICI recommendations and the government’s reassurances that it does not conduct political prosecutions.  We therefore respectfully urge the government to unconditionally and immediately release all Bahrainis being held for crimes related to freedom of expression.

Sincerely,

Keith Ellison, Member of Congress

Patrick Leahy, United States Senator

John Conyers, Member of Congress

Ron Wyden, United States Senator

Raul Grijalva, Member of Congress

Alcee Hastings, Member of Congress

Rush Holt, Member of Congress

Michael Honda, Member of Congress

Hank Johnson, Member of Congress

Barbara Lee, Member of Congress

Zoe Lofgren, Member of Congress

James P. McGovern, Member of Congress

James P. Moran, Member of Congress

John Olver, Member of Congress

Jared Polis, Member of Congress

Charles Rangel, Member of Congress

Jan Schakowsky, Member of Congress

Bahrain is putting the cart before the horse with its latest attempts at so-called social reconciliation

The government of Bahrain announced last week that they would provide the equivalent of $500,000 US to non-governmental organizations that develop ” social reconciliation” programs.  The Orwellian twist is that this latest effort joins previous initiatives aimed at Bahrainis — primarily at children and young people in school and camp settings — to attempt to influence them to “forgive and forget” past abuses and transgressions by the regime.  This, while Bahraini forces continue to tear gas and shoot birdshot pellets at its citizens, and people who have been tortured, innocent of wrongdoing, still languish in Bahraini prisons, including Abdulhadi Alkhawaja.

In addition to the the deaths and injuries related to police brutality, dozens of women in Bahrain have miscarried their unborn children because of excessive exposure to tear gas.

Perhaps this money might be better spent on reforming the regime’s security and police forces.  Oh, right, they tried that.  Efforts in that direction seem to be fruitless.  The regime’s forces are as vicious as ever.

Royalists in Bahrain label any person who supports the opposition, democracy, and human rights as a “terrorist” and anyone who attempts to bring light to these injustices as an instigator of violence.  The lion’s share of violence, however, is coming from the regime, as numerous, reputable journalists, human rights organizations, and witnesses have reported again and again.

Evidently “social reconciliation” in Bahrain does not involve protecting the human right freedom of speech.  At time of this announcement, the government banned all demonstrations and marches and imprisoned one of the nation’s foremost civil rights leaders, Nabeel Rajab, for speaking his mind on Twitter.

While Bahrain continues to imprison political prisoners…arrest, beat, and torture citizens for speaking their mind…tear-gassing villages…blinding and maiming children and adults with birdshot….any discussion of “reconciliation” is premature.

After all, we are not talking about a parking ticket here.  There have been hundreds of documented cases of human rights abuses, including torture and loss of life.  People have disappeared who are still not accounted for.  People have lost their jobs because of their beliefs.  Mosques, hundreds of years old, have been destroyed.

What kind of reconciliation was Bahrain seeking when they shot a tear gas canister into Zainab Alkhawaja’s leg at close range on June 27?  What kind of reconciliation were they seeking when they shot four-year-old Ahmed Alneham with buckshot, maiming him for life, while his father begged them to stop?

Actions speak louder than words.  Peace is impossible without freedom.  Reforms first — then reconciliation.

 

Nabeel Rajab: imprisoned for tweets, paying the price for the struggle for freedom

Witness Bahrain interviewed human rights activist and Bahrain Center for Human Rights President Nabeel Rajab in Bahrain yesterday (July 9) just before he was taken to jail for a three-month sentence related to an update he posted on Twitter.

In the video, Rajab states: “I will not stop and I’m teaching people not to stop. If everybody will keep quiet after putting them in jail, then it’s a disaster. We should challenge that. We should be willing to pay the price for the struggle for the freedom that we fight for. And this is the price.”

Read the entire Witness for Bahrain blog post here.

Nabeel Rajab arrested on unspecified charges after The Stream interview

Nabeel Rajab, President of the Bahrain Human Center for Human Rights, was arrested once again, yesterday, and remanded to jail for seven days, on

English: Nabeel Rajab protesting outside Muhar...

Nabeel Rajab (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

unspecified charges related to Twitter updates he posted.  Bahrain officials said they had received complaints about negative comments he allegedly made on social media sites about the residents of Muharraq.

Rajab alleges that the arrest was prompted by his Tuesday appearance, with Matar Matar, on the Al-Jazeera program, The Stream.

Fahad Albinali, media spokesperson at the Information Affairs Authority, refuted that anyone would be prosecuted for their statements on the program:

Subsequent to receiving the summons to appear, Rajab shared his theories of what circumstances led to the investigation:

Bahrain Update: Solidarity Rally for Nabeel Rajab

Bahrainis gathered yesterday to demonstrate their support for Nabeel Rajab, President of the Bahrain Center for Human Rights and the Gulf Center for Human Rights.  Mr. Rajab was recently released from prison on bail for posting Twitter updates the government said were illegal.  The participants held up copies of Mr. Rajab’s tweets.  One of the tweets deemed illegal by the government showed a picture of Ali Issa Saqr who had been tortured and killed while imprisoned.  Mr. Rajab’s next hearing has been scheduled for June 17

The Bahrain Coordinating Committee lends its full support for Nabeel Rajab and for his right to free political expression, and submits that all charges against him should be dismissed.

 

Bahrain Coordinating Committee Pledges Its Support For Freed Activist Zainab Al-Khawaja

 Bahrain Activist Zainab Al-Khawaja is Freed; Bahrain Coordinating Committee Pledges Its Support

Zainab Al-Khawaja[Washington, DC]   May 29, 2012 — The DC-based Bahrain Coordinating Committee is pleased by today’s reports that Zainab Al-Khawaja, daughter of renowned human rights activist Abdulhadi Al-Khawaja, has been released from prison in Bahrain, after her trial last week and the payment of her bail (BD 200, about $530 US).

The Committee supports Al-Khawaja’s right to free political expression and her commitment to achieving human rights for the people of Bahrain.

Khawaja was sentenced to one month in jail for protesting the Formula One Grand Prix in Bahrain.  However, since she had already served more than a month in jail — – having been arrested on April 21 — she was freed.

The 29 year-old activist will appear in court again on June 24 to face charges related to organizing demonstrations.

Khawaja is known for her tenacious participation in demonstrations and sit-ins supporting the pro-democracy movement in Bahrain.  She has emerged as a dynamic voice of the opposition, particularly in her use of social media.  Khawaja has more than 42,000 Twitter followers and posts updates on her Twitter profile @angryarabiya.

About the Bahrain Coordinating Committee

The Bahrain Coordinating Committee is a Washington, DC-based grassroots movement that works to obtain U.S. support for democracy and human rights reforms in Bahrain.  For more information, please visit http://www.BahrainCoordinatingCommittee.org